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In Part 1 of this series, we discussed the reason that meditation is so important today. We’re dealing with more anxiety than ever before, a problem that’s directly related to our inability to, in Blaise Pascal’s words, “sit in a quiet room alone.”

The technology that was supposed to keep us connected has left us disconnected, discontent, and unfamiliar with our own thoughts.

In Part 2, we’ll take a closer look at the spiritual side of meditation.

You can read Part 1 here…

Burning down our temples

What would you say if I told you that your “temple,” your mind and body, is on fire…

Burning from the pain, lack of forgiveness, and judgment we carry. Smoldering with anger, jealousy, and frustration… and reduced to ashes from isolation and lack of self-reflection.

And rather than put out the flames when our house is burning, it’s human nature to throw fire and try to set other people’s houses ablaze. 

It might sound dramatic, but the situation is serious: We’re facing an epidemic of anxiety, depression, and disconnect, and we need much more than just the band-aid of anxiety meds…

We need a cure!

Meditation is effective… but not instant

Meditation helps you fix the problem at its root. But expect this to be a journey, not an instant fix. Because we’re not used to sitting in that quiet room alone, it’s going to take some practice.

Studies show that meditation is as effective as Lexipro at controlling anxiety… but that the effects are gradual, increasing over time. 

You’ll need to be patient with yourself, but you will see incremental improvement, even from day one.

Meditation helps us face ourselves 

When you empty your mind and get present in the moment, you are finally alone with yourself. 

Meditation brings you face-to-face with who you really are…

And that might be uncomfortable at first. Most people are too afraid to see themselves for who they truly are, which is how we lose touch in the first place. 

It takes courage to be in a quiet room alone because we end up catching up with ourselves. 

During meditation, something in your mind expands… and in that greater space, you can start pointing to your thoughts and emotions rather than becoming consumed by them.

Meditation brings us closer to our creator

When you come to the end of self, you become present to something greater than yourself. It’s a connection to a higher source. A creator. God.

Most people are uncomfortable with the thought of becoming intimate with their creator. 

It means that you have to be less than something else, and our ego does not like that. Being able to connect to your creator takes a certain amount of humility. 

There’s a passage in the Bible that says “Be still and know that I am God.” 

There’s more to that passage… most people aren’t familiar with the full meaning of the word know. It means to be intimate with. 

When you meditate, you can choose to be still and have an intimate moment with…a connection to… your creator.

Practice meditation… for your own reasons

The bottom line is, meditation is good for you in many ways. The direction your meditation takes will vary with your intent… 

Do you want to calm your nerves and find relief from symptoms of anxiety, depression, or discontent? Perfect! Let this be the “why” that leads you to practice meditation.

Do you want to catch up with yourself, connect with your purpose, and rid yourself of thoughts and habits that are holding you back? Meditation will help you reach that goal.

Do you want to find access to your creator, connect with something greater than yourself? Meditate with that in mind.

Action points

Take a moment to reflect. Grab your journal and write down your thoughts…

In what ways is your “temple” on fire? Write down what comes to mind.

When we’re suffering, it’s human nature to throw fire and make others suffer, too. Ask yourself this:

  • Are there situations in your life where you might be throwing fire? 
  • Is it possible that the fire someone else is throwing might be due to the pain they feel from their own house burning?

What is standing in your way when it comes to sitting in a quiet room alone? Write down your fears. Sometimes seeing them in black and white can make them seem smaller.

What’s your “why” when it comes to meditation? Have this in mind when you begin. After you meditate, write down your experience… over time, you’ll start to see the progress you’re making!

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